we confirm from previous work that gender diversity remains very low in FOSS (<10% of contributions by women overall), that it has been getting "better" steadily over the past 12 years
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the overall trend applies worldwide, although with minor differences in specific regions (e.g., asian regions seem to be characterized by slower diversity increase rates)
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finally, we notice a significant *reduction* in women contributions to public code in 2020, correlated with the COVID pandemic. It is plausible that the pandemic has further reduced women ability to contribute to FOSS, hopefully only temporarily
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PS yes, the ":" before "and" is horrible, but it's not our fault and it's *not* in the paper, it's just the default and not overridable separator that HAL uses between title and subtitle /o\
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Thanks for sharing, will read it! “We classify author names by gender using name frequencies” Isn’t that problematic? Do you account for non-binarity, trans developers, as well as the evolution of names across gender lines over time?
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It is problematic, and acknowledged in the study as a limitation. There is a trade-off that we discuss between doing small scale focused studies (in which you can interview people and ask) and large scale studies. We're definitely on the latter end of the spectrum.
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The paper is very nice I've just read it. Congratulations !
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Thanks Bianca! (Also for your super-valuable recent work in this space, which we reference in the paper.)
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